I Guess The Sidewalk Wasn’t That Fun After All

This could be dangerous.

I’ve been trying to build up our twitter followers (@VinylVortexOK if you haven’t already followed) and I have been able to converse with vinyl and music enthusiast from all over the globe. It’s interesting to be a part of the conglomerate music conversation.

So I’ve had quite a few artists I’ve listen to that have followed me, but one that dmr2-smparticularly caught my ear, a California band named Dangermaker. Dangermaker made up of four members, Adam (vocals and guitar), Carlos (drum and backing vocals), Dave (keys, violin, and backing vocals), and Neko (bass and backing vocals).

So this is a foray in to music I normally don’t listen to and that I haven’t listened to through a needle. To be honest, I was skeptical, but if you really love music, I figured you can’t restrict it to one medium.

I am now addicted to this indie rock band who cites their influences as The Stooges, and David Bowie. Their guitar riffs are incapsulating and their vocal stylings capture emotion differently then I have ever heard. Any fan of pulsing rhythms, reverie guitar playing, and innovative lyrics should give this band a listen.

dangermaker-blackdream-cover-1500x1500Incapsulating. That’s the best word to describe this band’s music and the album Black Dream as a complete product. As I listened to their album, I felt completely surrounded in a shroud of sheer dark curtains with light coming from all directions.

The album opens with “You’re Not There,” a haunting tune about a lover gone astray. It’s intrinsic rhythm and unconscious vocals are something I’ve never heard before, but fell in love with at first listen. The music video is also pure genius. Watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y0MUUJ4erc.

I call these vocals unconscious because they seem to flow with the right tone, emotion, and consistency in such a natural way it must be instinctive.

The next songs I found to stick out were “Wake Up” and “Faith.” “Wake Up” begins with a haunting organ followed by a nice vocal riff then a soaring chorus that shows the bands versatility. “Faith” finds the band in a dark place declaring they don’t believe in faith. This is a direct anthem in never blindly relying on anyone.

The album then goes into “Nobody,” showing a more vulnerable side of the band with a soft intro. They then tap classic rock in “Tonight” and “Waiting On the Girl.”

The album closes with “Denise Macabre.” A powerful song about ones past and “skeletons.” Some of the best lyrical mastering of this album is on this track.

So as one who usually stays on the safe side, I found this band different. They are labeled as “Indie Rock.” I often find just to be a cop-out when an artist is different and doesn’t fall into a certain mold.

Well, Dangermaker knows exactly who and what they are and unabashedly portray that for the world to see on Black Dream. They perfect what their influencers created. This album is neatly wrapped in haphazard melodies and experimental instrumentation.

So this time I decided not to stay safe in what I know. I strayed from my safe sidewalk. Maybe next time I’ll jump off a cliff?

 

To get more info on Dangermaker check out their website: http://www.dangermaker.com