Back in My Mind Again

We all have those “go-to” artists. I have many of them including Judy Garland, Jack Jones,  and Loretta Lynn. My “go-to” artists are the those I am most familiar with, but the other night I listened to one and it struck a different chord with me.

I’m a sucker for every Supremes album I have ever heard and they are one of my top Supremesfavorites. I prefer “The Supremes,” over “Diana Ross and The Supremes.” Their earlier work, with the late Florence Ballard, possess something much different then their later work (don’t get me wrong though, I love Cindy Birdsong).

Although Ross is the lead in both groups, there is just a sense of sincerity, honesty, and unity in their earlier works. When they took Florence out it wasn’t the same.

Last Friday, June 12th, was the 50th anniversary of “Back in My Arms Again” going number one. I did not realize this was one of their number ones, and it was actually their 5th consecutive number one single. I immediately called my mother and asked her if she remembered this song. I then reminded her how old she is.

That evening I listened to the album that features “Back in My Arms Again,” More Hits By The Supremes. This album contains many of my absolute favorite Supremes’ songs including “Nothing But Heartaches,” “Stop! In the Name of Love,” and the lesser known “The Only Time I’m Happy.”

51bl0wd2zPL._SY300_The back liner notes are littered with pictures of the Supremes and their world reign as the top female group. As I listened and reflected on their career I am just astonished at what these three young ladies from Detroit were able to achieve through music. They are a cultural staple. Their beauty has out lasted decades and their impact on pop culture is profound.

Many credit the Supremes, and Motown, as making African-American performers acceptable in mainstream pop. The Supremes are at the head of this break through. They, along with artists like Mary Wells, Tammi Terrell, Marvin Gaye, and Smokey Robinson, were able to rise to fame during America’s difficult Civil Rights Movement. Although they were African-American in segregated America, they still had number one hits and rivaled Beatles fame.

This speaks to the power of music. It doesn’t matter your race, gender, orientation or background, for music transcends all of that. It penetrates straight to your emotions and soul. Due to this phenomenon sometimes history is made and that is exactly what happened with The Supremes. We were taught through their music that music has no tolerance for racism and social immoralities.

It also makes one realize it is never just music. Music, no matter what format, is essential to our history as human beings and a country. It ignites emotions and endorphins that nothing else can. Sometimes it even brings out the best in people and helps correct a long time wrong.

I guess you could say music has a supreme impact.

 

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