A Playlist From the Soul: December 3, 2017

As I am moving into my new “normal,” I have found my music choices all over the spectrum. This is not anything new though, I’m always all over the radar, but I thought it would be interesting to go over some of these songs. I wanted to think about why I’m listening to them. Maybe that can give me a clue of where I am in life and you can always judge somebody by the record collection or playlist, right?


“Proud Mary” –Tina Turner

Now I cannot completely verify this research, but I once read that “Proud Mary” doesn’t necessarily have a meaning. When John Fogerty wrote this song, he put together a bunch of different riffs and verses he had written. For me, this song makes complete sense, especially in my life now!

I really did just leave a steady career track to pursue a passion of mine. Right now I’m just rollin,’ and life has been rough, but in the end, everything’s nice and easy.

                                                               


“Mary Did You Know” –Kimberley Locke

Honestly, I have never really been into Christmas music. I’ve had a few favorites over the years, but I’ve never been elated to hear that first Christmas tune at Wal-Mart in July. I’m not a scrooge, just not overly festive. One of my favorite Christmas songs is “Mary Did You Know?” I love the song’s perspective. I’ve been looking for a simple version with a powerhouse vocal that brought justice to the lyrics. Kimberley Locke’s version does just that and I’m hooked.

      


“Roxanne” –The Police 

I cannot really explain why I am listening to this song. It popped into my head the other day and has been in the back ever since. I’ve been trying to figure out a few songs that I could start practicing myself that were outside the “piano” realm, but one that still echoed jazz sentiments. This song has so many great versions out there along those lines, but nothing beats the original.

      


“Purple Rain” –Prince

I’m starting to see an 80’s theme, but this is where it’s going to end. Lately I have been listening to music from Prince’s entire career catalog. “Purple Rain” is such a classic though. I can’t hear it once and not go on a binge listen for a few days….or weeks.

      


“Lady Blue” –Griffin Anthony

I discovered Griffin Anthony on Twitter a few months ago. Once I heard his album The Making of A Man, I was hooked to his vocal’s true country tones and soulful foundation. “Lady Blue” is one of my favorite tracks off of the album due to it’s pure honesty. You can sense both hope, frustration, and heartbreak woven in it’s lyrics. Expect a full review soon.

      


“New York” –St. Vincent

When I find myself in a “rut,” where I keep listening to the same artists and songs consistently, I force myself to try something new. I am a member of Vinyl Me, Please, and their album of the month was St. Vincent’s MASSEDUCTION. Read my full review of her album here. St. Vincent is innovative in both the sound of her music and writing. I love how so many of her songs change “attitude” throughout the song yet they always have a reigning theme.

      


“River” –Idina Menzel

Here is another one of favorite Christmas songs. I have been a fan of Idina Menzel for many years now, so naturally I did buy her Christmas album a few years back. Although this is officially Joni Mitchell’s classic, I fell in love with Menzel’s version. It was just what I needed that year and it has remained a staple in my winter playlist since.

      


“Good to You” –Jonny P 

Songs that have old school vibes with a modern twist always catch my ear. I found recently this one recently. My friend was talking about Jonny P and I found his music video on Vevo. I definitely plan to check out more of his music this week.

      


“Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)” –Darlene Love

Rolling Stone said it best when they declared that Darlene Love is one of the greatest singers of all time. I couldn’t agree more. In recent years, she is finally getting some of the well deserved credit and respect she truly deserves. This song will always remain a staple in Love’s career and it has cemented itself as a holiday classic. Love performed this song every year on David Letterman since 1986. Here is her first performance of her classic.

   


“Perfect” –Ed Sheeran and Beyoncé

Anything featuring Beyoncé will always get my attention. Yes, I am an unashamed member of the Bey Hive. Do not talk bad about her majesty in my presence. With that being said, I’m not 100% into this song. Ed Sheeran’s music has never really crossed my path, but this may have opened the door a tad. I am listening to this repeatedly trying to get fully into it. I’ll keep you posted.

Ed Sheeran:       

Beyoncé:       


So what does my playlist say about me? I’m not sure exactly what it says about me or where I’m at in life, but in the end it’s exactly where I need to be. Music is what you have when words are not adequate. What you listen too is what speaks to your soul. Now where does that leave me?

Who the heck knows, but I’m enjoying the journey…

                                                              

With All My Love, My Valentine’s Day Playlist

Every year I ponder a playlist of my favorite love songs for Valentine’s Day. Romance has played such a large part in my life that I have nearly gone 26 years without it. Every year I tell myself next year will be different. I’m always wrong. So below are some of the most romantic songs that I can come up with.

5. “Parasite” -Kiss

The word parasite derives from the greek word “parasitos,” which translates to “a person eating at anothers table.” One might also associate this word with leeches and malaria. I swore love was a synonym, but Webster is proving otherwise.  At any rate, we can all relate to people that may have these qualities….or scabies.

4. “Bang, Bang” -Cher

Now many may recognize this Sonny Bono penned song from either Cher’s original 1966 version or Nancy Sinatra’s 1966 cover. Anywho it just talks about two people who have literally been in love forever and one walks away. Basically, the song says it’s like a gunshot to the head. Hot damn, get me over to eHarmony right now!

3. “Thank God and Greyhound” -Roy Clark

I often think that country music explains love perfectly. Country songs touch that soft spot in my heart. In this song, by my fellow Okie Roy Clark, he really contemplates everything his lady has given him, actions like spending all his money and making him feel an inch tall. The clouded judgment love provides just sounds whimsical.

2. “Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright” -Peter, Paul, and Mary

Most of us know this beautiful song written by the legendary Bob Dylan. This song has been covered by numerous artists, but Peter, Paul, and Mary’s version is my favorite. It’s a little ditty of love intertwined with hints of sarcasm. Who cares if somebody wastes your time? You just can’t get it back. Like I always say, you win some, you lose some.

1.” What’s Love Got To Do With It” -Tina Turner

And then there is the mother of all love songs. There are so many questions this song asks that I ask myself every morning when I look in the mirror. Questions like, “Who needs a heart when a heart can be broken?” This song has now become my mantra. I just can’t help but think about how big of a “screw you” this song was to Ike Turner, signed with all Tina’s love of course.

Well folks, this is my 2017 Valentine’s day playlist. I hope it has filled you with joy and hope. Remember, it’s when your not looking that you will find that one special person….so keep your eyes open for there are a lot of parasites in this world that look like guns that need to take a greyhound far away from you. Don’t think twice about it, love has nothing to do with it.

With all my love, Gabe

Dusting My Shelves: The Ike and Tina Turner Show Vol. 2

This last weekend was my first venture into New York City to go on a vinyl hunt since moving to Westchester County.

My first find,was The Ike and Tina Turner Show Vol. 2. The record is in near mint condition and still has the shrink-wrap on it. Any vinyl collector can tell you how hard it is to find these older Ike and Tina Turner albums.

fullsizerender-14We all know the story of Ike and Tina Turner and personally I have no respect for Ike Turner. He may have been a good musician, but anyone who beats women immediately gets a “0” in my book. I love the fact that she went on to have a huge solo career without Ike and has been able to discover a happy life for herself.

“What’s Love Got To Do With It” was virtually a big “screw you” to Ike.

Although, what I discovered with this album, even though it presents Ike Turner, Tina Turner, and The Ikettes, was that Tina was a solo singer long before their divorce in 1978. Ike could not have made it without Tina and he knew she was a hot commodity. With this live album, released in 1965, Tina was already showing the foundation, at least vocally and musically, for a solo career.

This is obvious from the very beginning of the album. If the announcer acknowledged it by saying, “Introducing the main attraction of the evening, meet the star of the show, give her a nice friendly welcome, the fabulous Tina Turner!”

The album then immediately goes into Ike and Tina’s hit “Shake Your Tail Feather.” This track had a little too much Ikettes for me, but It also showed me how talented these ladies were Ike employed to back Tina. This is the same feeling I had for “You’re No Good” on side two.

fullsizerender-13Where Tina really shines is when she takes the mic alone. She first undertakes “Ooh Poo Pah Doo.” Her artistry comes out like a fire-ball wrapped in a lace blanket.

She quickly defines herself as a solor artist with “All I Can Do is Cry.” I have heard this song by Tina before, but never with quite this same passion. She told the story of being at “her man’s” wedding. In this emotional tune she was the preacher, choir, and usher.

Tina’s independence again becomes obvious on “It’s All Over” and “A Fool For You.””It’s All Over” is sang with some of Tina’s deepest emotion. I don’t think the song content was far from reality. She mixed this emotion with gospel styling and a rock sound that hadn’t been invented yet. She ends the show with the classic ballad “A Fool For You.” For some reason I feel like this may have been Tina’s true feelings when it came to fame.

It really didn’t matter who was backing Tina Turner in these early days of her career. After Ike and Tina Turner’s initial launch into stardom she instantly became the brightest star of the bunch.  Ike always resented this fact.

I really don’t feel the need to say “Ike” in front of Tina’s name. I respect that he influenced and arranged much of the music that made Tina famous, but there were others gladly waiting in line (Phil Spektor anyone?).

This album shows that Tina was a solo artist from the start. Ike was simply a dealer and Tina was the commodity. The only problem was, the commodity became larger than the dealer could manage.

Ike was always a better user anyway.

Yesterday is Not Over: The Sound of Melinda Doolittle

As I have dived deeper into the music listening world of vinyl albums, I have found a culture emerge, especially in the realm of vintage vinyl. I have vinyl records ranging from the 1940’s to today, but there is a different quality to some of my more dated albums and artists.

Back in the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s performers had a real task on their hands. Their career could not simply evolve around annual albums and recordings. These performers had to prove themselves time and time again in front of audiences. They had one shot to prove who they were, if it was an audience of 5 or broadcast to millions of people across the world. Their performance and raw talent defined their success.

FOX+American+Idol+Finale+Farewell+Season+Arrivals+1CsQg0FYyxRlThese performances did not have rewind, pause, or “do over” opportunities. It was a one shot game. If they missed, the audience in front may walk away, but if they made it, they had audiences for a lifetime.

That is exactly why I am a fan of Melinda Doolittle. Many of you will remember her from American Idol season six where she came in 3rd, yet I remember her for her timeless performances and how she encompasses the vinyl culture.

I recently sat down with Doolittle via Skype for a one on one conversation about her career, performance style, and what the music world means to her. After speaking with her one on one, I can tell you she is an artist of sincerity, skill, and raw talent.

To know Doolittle’s career and to understand her character and ambition, one must first start at American Idol. Ironically, this was a competition based solely on performance. We quickly began discussing different aspects of her season on American Idol, like what was it like to have Diana Ross as a mentor and the audition process. Doolittle told the story of how she went to try out for American Idol with a group of friends, frankly not expecting to get anywhere.

“When my friend talked me into auditioning for Idol, I thought of it like a joke. First of all, I didn’t think I was going to make it. Secondly, that I would make it as far as I did.”

This wasn’t a lack of confidence on Doolittle’s part though, she was simply content in her line of work. She had become a “first call” back up singer in Nashville. Often producers would wait for Doolittle to come into the studio and lay down background vocals for different artists, including Aretha Franklin, Aaron Neville and Michael McDonald.

“I loved singing background and I had the delusion that when the show was over that I would go back to that…It didn’t dawn on me that I was going to have to do the artist thing.”

Many of Doolittle’s performances dominated season six of American Idol. She got rave reviews for many of her performances from the judges, Randy Jackson, Paula Abdul, and Simon Cowell. Her first big breakthrough was her rendition of “My Funny Valentine,” after which Jackson said she was the one to beat. Cowell began to call Doolittle his personal favorite. When she was eliminated in the top three Cowell has remarked that she should have won.

Although, Doolittle was actually at ease when she didn’t win the American Idol crown. She said she was content and “not upset at all” when Ryan Seacrest called her name to be eliminated.

a98cdbaa5e964c4c82ab029d7d201700“The fact I made it to 3rd doesn’t sound right in my head and I never expected it, but it forced me to learn I really did have a voice as an artist. It taught me what my voice was.”

American Idol may have taught Doolittle what her voice was, but what she channels in her talents today is remarkable.

After season six, American Idol went on to set up meetings for Doolittle with various labels, most of tem being Christian labels. Doolittle, who is an avid Christian, didn’t want to sign with a Christian label.  Although she is a woman of strong faith and her concerts today are not complete with out a few gospel numbers, she wanted to make a different kind of record.

In the end, Doolittle was happy with the path her career initially took. She was free of a contract and in charge of her own musical fate. Doolittle began to shop around labels and eventually signed with Hi-Fi Records and recorded her debut album Coming Back To You. This was Doolittle’s coming out record for she took 10 steps up to the front mic for a full record. Now she needed backup singers.

“Idol forced me into being an artist, which is great. I feel like God tricked me into actually being an artist.”

Although this gave Doolittle freedom, she was also sceptical. When Doolittle began looking for labels she didn’t know what kind of music she wanted to do. She had already ruled out a Christian record at the moment and she was now ruling out pop, for a very observant reason.

“I feel when I try to sing pop it’s like an elephant stomping on a track. The track is all nice, light, and airy, and then I sing. I have a heavy voice.”

18888-coming-back-to-youSo Coming Back to You resulted in a pure soul album that was reminiscent of Whitney Houston, Gladys Knight, and Al Green. Doolittle said that she is just an old school girl and she didn’t know anything different. She made an album that was her style and by her own rules.

Doolittle has gone on to release various recordings that have received praise. Her most recent set of recordings is an extended play titled You’re The Reason in 2013. These tracks find Doolittle experimenting with modern R&B with a dash of pop while keeping in touch with her old-school, soulful roots. With this EP Doolittle co-wrote 3 of the 7 tracks. Writing was some what new for Doolittle and this process became therapeutic.

“When I went into the studio we were supposed to write a fun, up-beat, really great song. They asked me ‘What has been going on in your life?’ These people on Twitter had just reamed me. I posted a picture and they were saying ‘you’re so ugly.’ They were saying the worst things and I was so hurt by it, but I was trying to be strong about it…I needed to find out what my reaction to that is.”

Rolling with the punches was not an option for her and it was time to take a stand in her professional and personal life. Doolittle said she really didn’t find out who she was till about two years ago when this EP was released. This is obvious in the song content and the history behind these recordings.

melindadoolittle-epAlthough Doolittle had recorded with success, she stated that making records was not her favorite aspect of being an artist. So instead of delving deeper into her recordings we began to discuss her favorite way of delivering music: live performance. She was quick to say why she loved singing live.

“If there is not an audience I am bored out of my mind.”

Since American Idol Doolittle has performed around the world. She has performed at such esteemed venues as Carnegie Hall and The White House, amoungst many others. These experiences led Doolittle to look at making music differently then the industry’s generic formula. She decided to define herself through performing, not an album.

“From now on I’m going to let the shows determine the record. A lot of people let the record determine the show.”

Today, Doolittle decides what works with her voice by watching an audience’s reaction. It’s all about what the crowd brings out in her at that moment. The song has to work for both her and the people she is singing for. Then, I was curious what the determining factors assisted Doolittle in making musical choices.

“It’s the give and take with the audience. It doesn’t have to be because of applause. Sometimes I see it in somebody’s eyes, somebody cries when I’m singing or just like, I see joy on people’s faces in the audience….If their joy matches the joy I have singing it, then I found the song that works for both of us.”

Melinda_Doolittle_performs_in_the_East_Room_of_the_White_House

Singing at The White House.

For Doolittle it is completely about the performance of the music in the here and now. Sure, she makes brilliant recordings, but that’s not the only aspect she is focused on when it comes to music. She stated how she didn’t care about the production or how grand the show was, the most important thing to Doolittle is how her music connects with an audience. She likes to see this first-hand, when she has her one chance to prove to the people immediately in front of her that she is a true artist with real talent.

This is a little reminiscent of days past.

“I need people to have an experience when they come to a show. I need it to be an escape, because the world we live in is not fun.”

Number one songs and awards don’t determine Doolittle’s status as a musician, nor does she particularly care about accolades. An artist’s true mission should be the music, the message, and the performance. If the music doesn’t resonate what does it mean? If the performance isn’t an experience, why would you go?

Doolittle isn’t of the old school, she’s of the real school. She can really sing and she can really perform.

She doesn’t take music lightly and she is a master of her song in its rawest environment, a live performance. This is what the singers of yesterday possessed, but that doesn’t mean it is an antiquated idea. This is what I believe is the vinyl culture. The reason I collect vinyl is for its genuine, warm, and pure vocals. Basically, the over all performance.

Vintage vinyl has within its groves some of the best, unaltered voices and performances of some of the greatest artists. It took a certain caliber to make a record and perform when these albums were made. Doolittle is of the vinyl caliber.

Doolittle does not take this feat lightly and she is aware of the torch she is carrying. She explained how it meant the world to her when people compliment her and tell her how she channels the great soul and classic artists.

Cnb2kwmUkAANGVi.jpg-large“I met Percy Sledge before he died. He stopped me backstage at an event we did together. He said ‘You carry our mantle and there aren’t many who will. Please don’t loose that. Please continue to do this. Promise me that you will.’ I was like ‘Oh yes sir'”

As I talked with Doolittle and as I have listened to her music, I have fumed over so many names in my head of who’s mantle she is carrying. I’ve thought Diana Ross, Gloria Gaynor, Judy Garland, Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder, Tina Turner, Lionel Richie, and many more. The true question is now, how does Doolittle want to be remembered? Who does she look up too.

“I want to be Barbra [Streisand] with a side of Gladys [Knight].”

That, my fellow vinyl collectors, is the essence of a true performer, one that belongs on vinyl. Doolittle reminds me of the legends and performers that have come and gone, but the most important thing Doolittle reminds me is that….

Yesterday is not over.

Check out Doolittle’s latest performance with Scott Bradlee’s Post Modern Jukebox and hear Toxic like you’ve never heard it….

Tina Turner Country…Music?

There is barely any debate among music critics and listeners wheather or not Tina Turner is an impeccable artist. She has a style that cannot be replicated and a legacy that is sealed into society’s consciousness. Find me one person that doesn’t know when to shake their head during “Proud Mary” and I’d be shocked.

IMG_2377There is more music that often goes unnoticed from her career between being a solo superstar with the album Private Dancer and her tenure with the Ike and Tina Turner Review. Between the years of 1974, a year before she divorced Ike, and 1984, the year “What’s Love Got To Do With It” went number one, Tina recorded multiple albums to little success.

The first of these albums was Tina Turns The Country On! This album finds Tina at her first solo experiment. When looking at music history and the history of Tina’s style, the choice to release an album of country and western covers does not seem like the obvious next step in her career. Yet this album speaks volumes of where Tina was at in 1974 and also widens her breadth as a vocal artist.

This album comes right at the end of Ike and Tina Turner’s marriage. Their popularity had waned in the 70’s due to Ike’s frequent drug use, which resulted in missed and postponed shows. Tina was beginning to build her nerve through inspiration she had found through Buddhism which was the budding of her independence.

That’s the diamond in the rough when it comes to Tina’s first solo album: independence. For the first time, she was given the most freedom on how she was going to conduct herself as a muscian.

Tina Turns The Country On! is completely…country. Tina knows country because she was brought up in Tennessee, but I don’t think anybody was expecting her to sing it. Each song is a cover of a country hit with a new arrangement and that arrangement was…country.

Tina Turner, the queen of rock and roll R&B, now had twang.

IMG_2378I could see Tina doing a twist off of Ray Charles successes from his early 1960’s country themed albums, but I didn’t expect a performance I would have readily seen on The Wilburn Brothers Show or The Johnny Cash Show. I was expecting a blended mix of early R&B and country, but instead she fit in perfectly right next to Loretta Lynn.

There are three levels of Tina within the album and with each level she becomes more…Tina. I call the first level “Mid-Tina.” This level finds Tina singing with the roughness we have all grown to love, but mixed with smooth twang. We find this on the songs “Bayou Song, “If You Love Me Let Me Know,” and “Don’t Talk Now.”

Next we venture into “Tina Turned Up.” This is the Tina we generally find in her earlier recordings with Ike Turner. These elements are found in songs such as Bob Dylan’s “Tonight I’ll Be Staying Here With You” and Hank Snow’s “I’m Moving On.”

Lastly, we have “Tina Turned Down.” In this level, Tina demonstrates her chops for delivering straightforward and easy masterpieces. This level contains all my favorite songs from this album. First she sings a vulnerable and rousing rendition of Kris Kristofferson’s “Help Me Make It Through The Night.” Her voice is as smooth and liquid as melted butter. Her performance of this song finds her vocals in their most purest form. It is like they come from a child.

Tina-Album-Tina-Turns-The-Country-On-Promo-02Then there is the hopeful Dolly Parton cover “There’ll Always Be Music.” I could easily see a choir erupting behind Tina at any moment during this recording. Her genuine love of unadulterated music is on complete view. She then closes out the album with “The Love That Light’s Our Way.” This song eludes to the concrete truth that love will always prevail and lead the way, a sentiment that was muddled for Tina at this time. Her vocals in this song will convince anybody, that truth and love always prevails, something she still believed deep down.

This album begins to encapsulate the independent artistry of Tina Turner. It shows that she was not only a musical interpreter that crossed genres, but one that can reach the furthest of human emotions in the same fell swoop. She takes country music, flips it on its head, reconstructs it, and sings it her way, but she was still under a jail cell.

Her later solo efforts were to be completely independent of Ike Turner in all regards. This album shows that all you need sometimes is to let someone shake their own tail-feather and to never restrict someone to be a private dancer. This artistry within Tina was nearly untapped and it was time for the world to hear it.

It was time for Tina to be Tina.

That Infectious Smile You Get

Today I was driving with my head phones on. I decided to listen to a live version of Tina Turner’s “Proud Mary” from her 2009 tour. This has always been one of my favorite Turner songs like the majority of the world, but this time I felt something different.

I just oddly began smiling. After around a minute into the smile I realized how odd I must look to those passing me.

So tonight I have decided to compile a list of songs that give me that infectious smile or at least those songs that make me look like I’m smiling at nothing while driving.

1. “Proud Mary” -Tina Turner

If you are a music fan and don’t love the energy, spunk, and high-octane vocals this song possesses then I do not know who you are. “Proud Mary” immediately hooks me from the beginning guitar rift to Turner telling me how she likes to sing it “nice and rough.” Every time I hear this song I find myself (to the best of my ability) doing Turner’s iconic dance moves as the song progresses, but I will warn you, my legs ain’t that pretty. Least we forget the original though by Creedence Clearwater Revival.

2. “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” -Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell

There has never been another blend of vocals like Marvin Gaye’s and Tammi Terrell’s. They are simply superb. Tammi’s voice echoed that of Diana Ross and Aretha Franklin combined. She had a star-studded career ahead of her until brain cancer stole her away from the world too soon. AIthough she now dwells in the valley of peace, her artistry lives on. I could go on and on about this song, but there’s only two other words that truly describe its greatness….Marvin Gaye.

3. “I Was Made For Lovin’ You” -Kiss

This is pretty much my anthem for every Tinder swipe…ummm…date I go on. I try to walk out of the house with the spirit of the star child intertwined in my swagger, but it doesn’t ever quite work out. I’m not sure if it is because the 1970’s are over or if I just can’t quite find my mojo. I never did think those leotards looked good on me anyway.

4. “If I Could Turn Back Time” -Cher

What’s a list without Cher!?! I have been in a long-term relationship with Cher since I was about 11. She has always liked younger men that are on the shorter side so I fit the bill. This riveting song was penned by the great Diane Warren and is one of her best pop masterpieces. From Navy ships to bootys and hips, Cher never disappoints.

5. “All Night Long (All Night)” -Lionel Richie

This song and I go way back. I grew up listening to Richie and his smooth vocals. My mother had many of his cassettes in the car and we would listen to them…. a lot. I’ll admit, as a young kid I wasn’t a fan, but then I grew up and I was like “Hello!” I have been addicted to his music and writing genius ever since. Moms generally know what’s best, yet she never let me dance all night long. First it was the 9:00 bedtime then the curfew.

There are many, many more songs that make me extremely happy. I could literally go on and on. It would be impossible for me to make a complete list. It’s like asking me who my favorite singer is. In closing I would like to leave you with a brief poem I wrote especially for this post.

If you need me call me

No matter if you are rolling on the river

No matter if sailing on a riverboat queen

I was always made for loving you

No matter how far back you turn back time

We’ll have a party, fiesta, whatever

All night long

A Spring Record Haul…In January

Today I went out to a few record shops here in Oklahoma City, where it is 74 degrees! I haven’t taken a look at these stores in at least a month or more. I have been striving to save money and listen to what I have, yet that never satisfies us vinyl collectors does it?

I mean food, rent, or vinyl? I think the obvious answer is vinyl

I did sacrifice today though. Instead of keeping the vinyl I don’t like I took it back for trade in. I didn’t get nearly the amount I paid for them in the first place, but I’d rather somebody enjoy them then collect dust on my shelf.

IMG_1789I made my first stop at Guestroom Records. This is where I found the Tina Turner 1980’s compilation. It’s clearly an 80’s press trying to capitalize off of her Private Dancer success. I can never resist a Turner album I don’t have, even if it is merely a compilation.

Next I made a stop by Monkey Feet Music. They are a newer store here in the OKC metro, but I am quickly finding them a force to be reckoned with. I always find nice clean vinyl there and Chris, the owner, is always looking out for my favorites and suggesting new favorites. This is where I found my nearly mint David Bowie Let’s Dance, Cher’s disco infused Take Me Home, and The Judd’s first mini LP.

Sadly there is so much music and so little time. Out of my 1100 records I did not anything by David Bowie, but I have been listening to him constantly on Spotify at work. I think I have committed a music and vinyl sin not listening to him until now. May he rest in peace and his music live forever.

Lastly, I made a stop at my always favorite Trolley Stop CQYNQG0VAAAWC98Record Shop. I have been frequenting this store for a few years now and the owner, John, is a record genius. When you shop in there you find great records and get a great conversation. He is nearly an expert in musicians from Oklahoma. This is Where I found Dusty Springfield’s Custom Deluxe (A Japanese Import!) and Oklahoma’s own Lee Hazlewood’s, Houston.

Now I just have one problem. I have a friend’s birthday party tonight. Now I know I should be looking forward to this, but I really just want to sit at home and listen to all my new music. The struggle is real.

I guess I need to be a normal 25-year-old for a little while. Have a great day vinyl world and please let me know what you are spinning!